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Yes, to attract attention to your posts/questions, you can start a bounty on them. You should carefully read this, which explains what a bounty is and what the consequences are (i.e. you will not get your reputation back even though you're not satisfied with the answers or it's not even guaranteed that you will get an answer at all).


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Bounties can be an incentive, by my sense is they are mostly attractive to people new to a given stack, who want to build initial rep quick. (There are good reasons for this, as it confers a series of privileges.) When I'm new on a stack, I seek out questions I can answer to get basic mod privileges quickly, so I can start doing some "housekeeping"...


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I pushed hard to increase to 4, and wanted 5, because we were getting crushed at one point, and one of our current mods was taking the brunt. Things seem to have normalized, such that, unless my fellow mods are calling for expansion, I'm ok with the present condition. I personally haven't had much time in the last couple of years, but I was also burned out ...


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Short Version: There's no official limit. StackOverflow has the most, with 24, but sites the size of AI.SE typically have 3-4 (though AI.SE has had more simultaneously in the past). Long Version: StackOverflow currently has 24 ♦moderators but they also get 10 million visits/day and 5.7k questions/day right now. Here's the sites that have approximately the ...


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I've grappled with this on rare occasions, where I can't undo unless the question or answer is edited. My metric for whether I'm going to edit, and probably piss someone off is: How much harm does it cause If it's trivial, I might leave it, especially if it's just an upvote. But I think, in the case of accepted answers, where it would cause harm, one just ...


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My sense is that interest waxes and wanes over the course of years. Sometimes the user becomes re-inspired and comes back, sometimes not. I have multiple stacks where I either have high current participation, or don't have time/inclination to think about. This usually ping pongs with my core areas of interest. But you're on the right track that what we ...


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Simple answer: Prior to nbro and Dennis, our scope was insanely broad This was because I was appointed mod by Stack when the prior mods left, knew there were issues, and felt that the community should decide what this stack needed to be. We had a few years of this, with varied success, but did manage to attract enough committed, expert users, to yield our ...


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I like this. Go ahead and create it. If other users have objections, we can always remove.


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Absolutely! This is an area where I have formal training, and can legitimate go back to proto-indo-european. (But people typically don't like my analyses b/c they conflict with their own.) If you see any unanswered terminological question, or are interested in the etymology, this is an area of special focus for me in the tech industry and academia, as is ...


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I don't have the time/focus/energy to do this, but, if I did, I would spam social media sites with the best Q&As. It's blows my mind, but people actually got to places like Quora and reddit for information. I'm not saying you can't occasionally finds pearls hidden under all the garbage, but it's rarely worth the effort. Users on other stacks used to ...


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I think it depends also partly on the question. If it's a formal question, or a hard science question, with a precise, provable answer, disclaimer would be good, and acceptance of downvotes if other's deem it incorrect. (OK to remove also.) For fuzzy questions, which I often answer a lot of on other stacks, I'll directly say "this is my guess" ...


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