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is just another name for . Can we perhaps merge these tags, with being the real one?

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Yes, it's pointless to have two tags referring to the same thing. Since had three questions and had four (and all but one DeepQA question had the Watson tag already), I manually merged the tags together by removing .

One could make the argument that DeepQA is the research project while Watson is the product, but all of the questions tagged were about Watson.

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  • $\begingroup$ A synonym was appropriate here, so I added it. $\endgroup$ – Robert Cartaino Aug 17 '16 at 14:43
  • $\begingroup$ @kenorb That's why I typically wait for community input before I jump in an make a change like that (cc Ben). No harm done. There are relative few questions in play here. Tag/re-tag them as you wish. $\endgroup$ – Robert Cartaino Aug 17 '16 at 15:12
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    $\begingroup$ Precisely. Though I do see them as different I wouldn't be offended if they were merged, since anyone talking about DeepQA would probably be referencing Watson, and likely would include both the Watson and NLP tags to satisfactory effect. Other non-DeepQA NLP questions would just use the NLP tag. Since DeepQA is only so popular (as far as I know), the slight decrease in precision may be worth the simplicity. To me the deciding factor is how much people care specifically about the DeepQA part of Watson itself, and if that warrants its own tag. $\endgroup$ – Avik Mohan Aug 17 '16 at 15:48
  • $\begingroup$ @RobertCartaino Right, normally I wait for consensus before removing a tag. In this specific case, considering the tag's very few questions, the clearly duplicitous way in which it was used, and its lack of tag wiki, I figured I'd save everyone some time and blow it away myself :) Thanks for making a synonym, that way future users of [deepqa] will be automatically redirected. $\endgroup$ – Ben N Aug 17 '16 at 18:46
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    $\begingroup$ @AvikMohan Yes, there could conceivably be a difference. As the tag had been used, though, they were the same. $\endgroup$ – Ben N Aug 17 '16 at 19:48
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Watson is the name of the computer, and DeepQA is the name of the technology and software. They both correlated, but Watson sounds like more specific, but on the other hand there are no any known computers which are using DeepQA which aren't called Watson.

We do not know if there are any other computers which uses DeepQA technology, but not related to Watson. There could be some implementation of DeepQA not being called Watson. To simplify things, both terms can be synonyms where should be the main tag, since it is more popular (it has its own Wikipedia page, where DeepQA does not).

More detailed information about the differences check @Avik post and the following answer:

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I would be careful to merge the two together. is very much just that - a deep learning approach to questions and answers. This covers NLP, hypothesis formation, candidate answer generation, and answer selection from the candidates. It is fully limited to that domain.

These pages show what I'm getting at:

https://www.research.ibm.com/deepqa/deepqa.shtml http://researcher.watson.ibm.com/researcher/view_group_subpage.php?id=2159 http://researcher.watson.ibm.com/researcher/view_group_subpage.php?id=2162 http://researcher.watson.ibm.com/researcher/view_group_subpage.php?id=2160

On the other hand, is this titanic over-arching project that dips into culinary arts, healthcare, and more recently education and other topics I'm sure I'm missing. It is the foremost product of IBM's cognitive computing research and has numerous applications and uses, and elements that construct it. It goes well beyond just the QA portion (which is an integral part of Watson, but not the entirety or even nearly a synonym of Watson).

For this reason, I personally think they are certainly different topics, but being new to stack exchange I'm not sure how you would like to handle this.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thank you, I will add those soon (or feel free to do so yourself) $\endgroup$ – Avik Mohan Aug 17 '16 at 15:01

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